Chris to head a review into disability and public appointments

It was today (6 June) announced that Chris will lead a review looking at how to encourage more disabled people to apply for public appointments. The review will explore why the proportion of applicants for public appointments who declare a disability is low compared to the UK population as a whole, and how the process could be improved to encourage more applications from disabled people. It is expected that the review will make recommendations and will report later this year.  Chris said:

“I’m delighted that the government is looking seriously at this issue. Public appointments play a fundamental role in shaping society as well as within the organisations themselves. I look forward to working with the government to better understand and improve the recruitment process so that we can address the reality that whilst talent is everywhere, opportunity is not.”

The review is part of the Government’s Diversity Action Plan which also includes an ambition that by 2022, half of all public appointees should be female and 14% should be from ethnic minorities, bringing representation on public boards in line with the wider population of England and Wales.

Minister for Implementation, Oliver Dowden said:

 “I’m thrilled to announce that Lord Holmes will be leading the review. He combines expertise in accessibility, diversity and inclusion, as well as a wealth of personal experience on public boards.”

 

Today’s announcement was made at the Public Chairs’ Forum Diversity, Inclusion and Equality for Boards event, where the Minister spoke to Chairs of Public Bodies about his ambition for diversity in public appointments. It follows a commitment made in the Government’s Diversity Action Plan, launched in December 2017, to commission a review into the barriers facing those with visible and non-visible disabilities when considering public appointments.

 

 Centre for Public Appointments

 The Commissioner for Public Appointments

GDI hosts Disability Innovation Summit

The Global Disability Innovation Hub (GDI Hub), which Chris chairs, hosted a two day Disability Innovation Summit on 13th and 14th July 2017.
Chris standing in front of banner with Global Disability Innovation Hub logo
The GDI Hub is London’s new global research centre bringing together thought leaders and practitioners, from many disciplines, with knowledge and experience of design and disability. Through collaboration, technology, partnerships and study GDI’s mission is to improve the lives of disabled people worldwide.

Based in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, the GDI Hub is part of the 2012 Paralympic legacy programme. Over two days (13th and 14th July) linked to the World Para Championships, the Disability Innovation Summit, provided an opportunity to bring together disabled and non-disabled experts from around the world to share expertise and ideas to inspire and shape the future of disability innovation.

Technology is shifting the disability landscape. Advances in prosthetics, wheelchairs, wearable tech and bionics are changing the lives of disabled people and the potential is huge. The summit aimed to nurture and encourage those working at the forefront of engineering, computing, robotics, sport and art to come together, share knowledge and push the boundaries of design.

The summit included keynote speeches, workshops and panel discussions:

  • The latest technologies and research
  • Disability dance, fashion and art
  • Global projects and innovations
  • Assistive technology
  • Built environment and inclusive design
  • Sport and community
  • Workplace and employment

Disability Innovation Summit

Chris to Chair Global Disability Innovation Hub

Chris standing in front of banner with GDI logo

 

Share this page

“Pubs are for everyone; Why being accessible is important.” Guidance launched.

The British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA) has published updated guidance for pubs to help licensees make their venue as welcoming as possible to those with access needs. Chris was at the launch and is delighted to endorse the guidance saying it “provides lots of useful information for licensees to help those with access needs enjoy the Great British pub.” The foreword to the guidance is written by Baroness Tanni Grey Thompson DBE, who points out that “accessibility is not simply about physical access to the pub, but rather it is about creating the best experience for all who visit”. The guidance gives six key features for an accessible pub: 1. Access ramp at door 2. Hearing loops on bar 3. Large print menu 4. Accessible toilet with disability sign on door 5. Staff trained to meet needs of disabled customers 6. Layout – easy to navigate and clear of obstacles.Let’s hope the guidance is circulated widely and embraced by all pubs. Read the guidance in full.