Keynote speaker at Adidas Diversity Day Event.

Adidas Keynote

Chris was invited to speak at a major diversity and inclusion event at Adidas HQ on the topic of inclusion for innovation. The corporate focus was on the belief that the best teams are diverse teams, that the company should mirror the society they serve and that for change to happen, it must be actively pursued. In the words of the CEO’s father: “it takes a long time to do something you’re not really working on.” Chris was delighted to deliver the keynote and so much of the power of his personal experiences and philosophy spoke perfectly to the themes of the day. More than most, Chris understands the power of sport to change lives; his own story of adjusting to the unexpected shock of losing his sight as a child to become one of the country’s most successful Paralympians illustrates a deep understanding of inclusion. As he says, making a case for staying in his mainstream school and continuing in his swimming club were experiences of diversity and inclusion “before the terms really existed”. Chris goes on to discuss the various ways technology can be used to innovate for inclusion – from cassette tapes to Bluetooth beacons! – but also makes the point that innovation of thought is as important as the practical tools. A commitment to welcoming and supporting diversity is the major requirement for successful outcomes. What is often viewed as bold, brave, risk-taking he argues is not actually risk-taking when it’s doing the right thing for the right reasons. He gives many fascinating examples of successful inclusive and innovative achievements around the London 2012 games.  As Chris says “it’s not easy but it is essential”. When thinking particularly about the power of digital to disrupt, his passionate exhortation is to “become diverse or die.”

Seeing isn’t believing"Ted" talk

Later on in the day Chris delivered another short presentation, “Seeing isn’t believing” which focused on his sporting achievements and was inspired by his popular TedX talk.

Chris really enjoyed all the connections and conversations throughout the day and wanted to thank everyone who came to say hello. Discussions covered many aspects of the diversity and inclusion agenda but Chris was delighted by the enthusiasm for one of his key messages; that change can happen when one person believes that things can be other than they are.

Adidas Meet

Chris interviewed for launch of podcast on eye health and sight loss

VISION 2020 UK, the umbrella organisation which leads collaboration in eye health and sight loss, has launched a podcast. This new platform will look at the major topics of interest within the eye health and sight loss sector, with expert analysis, opinion and debate. The podcast is an educational forum for professionals, service users and carers as well as those with no knowledge of the topics.

Hosted by John Welsman, Guide Dogs Policy Business Partner, the podcasts will be released on a monthly basis and will focus on one topic or interview per episode, highlighting the work of the VISION 2020 UK Standing Committees, as well as discussions with leaders in the sector on topics such as rehabilitation, dementia, children and certification.

The first two podcasts are now available through the VISION 2020 UK website, on audioboom, and will soon be found on iTunes (search ‘VISION 2020 UK’). These episodes feature Mercy Jeyasingham, CEO, VISION 2020 UK and Chris! Chris gives listeners an understanding of his background, his achievements to date and his areas of concern and interest around eye health and sight loss. One of his major areas of concern is the issue of shared space.

John Welsman, commented, “Podcasts are a great way of discussing complex topics as well as being entertaining and informative. The ability of people to listen to the podcast on their commute, in their car or at home is a great way of communicating these issues. I look forward to working with VISION 2020 UK to create an engaging and professional podcast”.

Listen to Chris’s interview

 

“Pubs are for everyone; Why being accessible is important.” Guidance launched.

The British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA) has published updated guidance for pubs to help licensees make their venue as welcoming as possible to those with access needs. Chris was at the launch and is delighted to endorse the guidance saying it “provides lots of useful information for licensees to help those with access needs enjoy the Great British pub.” The foreword to the guidance is written by Baroness Tanni Grey Thompson DBE, who points out that “accessibility is not simply about physical access to the pub, but rather it is about creating the best experience for all who visit”. The guidance gives six key features for an accessible pub: 1. Access ramp at door 2. Hearing loops on bar 3. Large print menu 4. Accessible toilet with disability sign on door 5. Staff trained to meet needs of disabled customers 6. Layout – easy to navigate and clear of obstacles.Let’s hope the guidance is circulated widely and embraced by all pubs. Read the guidance in full.

Delighted reaction to newly established “Paulley Principle” on accessible transport

Chris and Lottie in front of bus

The Supreme Court today ruled on a long running dispute between FirstGroup Plc and Doug Paulley. In 2012, Mr Paulley, a wheelchair user, had been unable to board a bus when another passenger with a pushchair refused to move allow him to use the space. Mr Paulley  had argued operator FirstGroup’s “requesting, not requiring” policy was discriminatory. The court ruled that this policy of requiring a driver to simply request a non-wheelchair user to vacate the space without taking any further steps was unjustified. Chris welcomes the “important milestone” but noted that as the judgement was with limits it may be necessary to look again at issues with existing legislation.  Further legislation may offer the clarity and emphasis that is so urgently required to make sure disabled people feel confident about exercising an equal right to access public transport.

Supreme Court Judgement

Chris welcomes Commons Report into Accessible Stadia

Top of the league clubs: Derby County, Wrexham, Tranmere Rovers, Egham Town; all have been named as examples of excellence in making their clubs truly welcoming of disabled supporters. You will note that none of these clubs are in the Premier League. In Sept 2015 the Premier League promised to make all clubs accessible to disabled people. The House of Commons Select Committee on Culture Media and Sport report published today states that it’s “very clear” that sports clubs, notably many of those with very considerable income and resources, have not done anywhere near enough for sports fans with disabilities in recent years, despite the increase in income many of those clubs have enjoyed.” Given the examples above I would say it is clearly a question of will rather than resources and Greg Clarke of the Football Association agrees, telling the committee “that for the Premier League the problem was not money”. Football is our national sport, beloved by so many of us, and it needs to rediscover its moral compass. If not on its own then with some help. Both the commons committee and the Minister for Sport have said they would support legal action against clubs that miss the August deadline and Bill Bush, executive director at the Premier League spoke of fines of up to £25,000. I would urge both the Premier League and the Equality and Human Rights Commission to use all means at their disposal to ensure that disabled supporters are no longer treated as second class citizens when they want to support their football team.

Chris’s letter to the Times: Football’s Failure

Watch Channel 4’s report: Are football stadia no go for disabled?

BBC Sport: Disabled access: Premier League clubs may face sanctions over lack of improvement

What can law firms learn about diversity from the world of sport?

Still from Travers Smith Diversity VideoLaw firm, Travers Smith, have recently launched a diversity and inclusion initiative called “be a game-changer”, which they hope will harness the power of sport to help the company build diverse and collaborative teams and create an inclusive workplace. Chris took part in a though provoking panel discussion that explored several themes around this idea and spoke powerfully of his own experiences in sport, both as competitor and then director at London 2012. One of the lessons he explored was how companies can identify and support talent. There were also fascinating insights into how unconscious bias works and what individuals can do to make a difference, and ultimately create a more inclusive environment for everyone. Watch a short film to learn more about aims of the initiative.

 

Leadership lessons: Reflections on Rio

Less than four weeks before the opening ceremony of the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, there was a real chance the Games would be cancelled: not watered-down, less than it could have been, but literally no Games at all. The reason was a complete lack of interest in the Paralympics by the organising committee’s top team. Chris has reflected on the key leadership lessons to be drawn from almost catastrophe of the Rio Paralympics for Changeboard HR Magazine.

 

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